R Venkataramanan

R Venkataramanan

R Venkat's Blog

R Venkat's Blog
"To be an Inspiring Teacher,one should be a Disciplined Student throughout Life" - Venkataramanan Ramasethu

SNK

SNK

Sunday, February 24, 2013

Being a fool is a handicap, but being half intelligent is harmful – Let us shed our narrow & parochial outlook to serve our patients better – Thoughts by Venkataramanan Ramasethu

A recent trend among a certain section of our profession is to despise institutional practice and indulge in negative propaganda about the institutions to which they were affiliated in their formative years. Undoubtedly they have a ready argument that the private practice option offers more independence and better financial prospects, but having said that what about the ethics and principles. If there are two professions that still have a trace of nobility left in them it is health care profession and teaching profession. But it’s ironical that these two professions are at the receiving end off late for all wrong reasons. This is since a section of our friends in the industry are busy indulging in all kinds of negative and unethical practices to sustain and flourish their hidden agendas. But what happens to the common man? Is it a curse that he would be deprived of good quality care, because he would not be able to afford the private practioners exorbitant fees? Actually in an institutional practice there are certain distinct advantages of having everything under one roof and as the volumes would be high, the cost also could be minimized and kept under check. Also the academic environment gives the doctors and other allied professionals ample scope to enhance their clinical and academic skills, but unfortunately a section of our professional colleagues in the industry use the institutional practice to nicely gain a patient base and when they quit the institute to start their private practice, take with them a major chunk of the patients. Their side of the argument being that they have rendered service to the patient, while their stay at the institution and now when they opt for private practice, the patient naturally becomes their property. There could be nothing more unethical than this kind of an approach, afterall the patient had not walked in to the individual just like that, it was the trust and confidence he had in the institution that motivated him to visit and in the process the respective individual doctor or the allied health care professional got an opportunity to serve the patient.

To opt for a private practice or an institutional practice is a completely individual decision, but what is important is that working relationships might change, but one does not have the moral authority to undermine and subdue ones almamater,afterall the place where one learned the basics of our business. Even more unethical is to spread negative propaganda and try and demotivate the peer group with concocted facts about institutional practice. There could be pardon to any kind of betrayal, but “Guru Droha” meaning betrayal to one’s own teacher and almamater would never have positive outcome.

We should remember Mahabharata in this context, we all know the story of Karna who had lied to Parasuram about his background, claiming himself to be Brahman though being a Kshatriya.Parasuram had cursed Karna, that he might have learned everything from him but as he had lied to his Guru, he would forget the skills exactly at the moment he needs it the most. Similarly one should always remember that irrespective of any situation, one should never resort to lies about anybody or any place that had taught us our skills. As it was said once, the blessings from ones Guru is very powerful, but the Curse from the Guru could be equally harmful.

But of course Ekalavya would always be the darling of every Guru, since he is an epitome of Guru Bhakthi and Guru Vandana. He probably was the only person in the history of this universe who mastered everything possible under the sun, without a Guru but the same time when his Guru asked him to offer his thumb as Guru Dakshina; he offered it without any hesitation, knowing fully that it would permanently handicap him from wielding bow and arrow. Some might argue that Ekalavya was a fool and he need not have done what he had done, so he is responsible for his own situation. These arguments might never end…

But being a fool is a handicap, but being half intelligent is harmful…